Iowa City Barn Tour, June 23 & 24, 2012
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Roberts Barn -- The octagon barn was built in 1883 on a foundation of locally quarried stone 14 to 16 inches thick.  The barn is two stories high and each one of the eight sides is 26' long.  The barn is 61 feet in diameter.  Built in 1883.
June 2012 Barn Tour.
The Roberts Barn is still a working barn for a 440-acre farm.  The land has been in the Roberts family since the Civil War when John E. Roberts settled in the area.  The barn is on the National Registry of Historical Places.
June 2012 Barn Tour.
Ostrem Barn.  The barn on the right is being dis-assembled, and will be re-assembled a mile away.  The red barn is described below.
June 2012 Barn Tour.
Ostrem Barn.  Barn was built 1940 with native oak lumber from the barn site.  Beams are pegged mortise and tenons.  The barn has a Dutch style Gambrel roof with southern exposure over hanging roof line for weather protection to animals and to the doors into the lower level.  The extended gable peak is for mounting the hayfork track and getting hay thru the hay door into the haymow.  The barn is used for horses.
June 2012 Barn Tour.
Dis-assembly has begun on the old barn.
June 2012 Barn Tour.
Altmaier Barn.  Pennsylvania-style barn was built in 1885.
June 2012 Barn Tour.
The lower level with animal stalls has a protecting overhang and doors facing the South.
June 2012 Barn Tour.
Interior lower level.  Stone for the foundation was quarried locally as well as the lumber coming from the barn site.
June 2012 Barn Tour.
A typical bank barn with entrance ramp gives access to the second floor on the North side.
June 2012 Barn Tour.
Altmaier Barn, interior upper level.  Hand hewn beams with mortise and tenon construction and wooden pegs.
June 2012 Barn Tour.
Johnson County Home Barn.  Johnson County Supervisors procured 160 acres on the edge of Iowa City for a "poor farm" to provide care with economy.  This prairie style barn with lean-to stall was part of that purchase.
June 2012 Barn Tour.
Gough Barn.  In 1997, a strong wind moved the barn six-inches off its foundation and caused it to lean sideways.  With ropes, pulleys and leverages, a crew of Amish men moved it back onto the foundation (using tapered concrete piers) and straightened it.
June 2012 Barn Tour.
Gough Barn.  The lower hip roof section that wraps around the center haymow was for the cattle.
June 2012 Barn Tour.
Gough Barn.  This barn has a unique center haymow which goes from ground level to the peak of the roof.  It held some 10,000 bales of hay, by just stacking it up.
June 2012 Barn Tour.
Gough Barn.  Note that the wooden posts supporting the roof are all one piece of timber, and that probably kept the barn from just falling down during the storm.  Temporary farm workers slept in the loft (left).
June 2012 Barn Tour.
Miller Barn.  This Gothic arch-style barn is a working dairy barn, built in 1948 by the present owner's grandfather.  It is constructed of hollow clay tile on a concrete foundation and is 36 feet by 70 feet.
June 2012 Barn Tour.
Miller Barn  The small room to the right is the milk room.  The gable side of the barn has a hay door with hay track and carrier for loading hay into the haymow -- note that it slides open, rather than folding down, as most do.
June 2012 Barn Tour.
Miller Barn.  Here is the 14-foot lean-to on the east side of the barn.
June 2012 Barn Tour.
Miller Barn.  The barn also features a cement haymow floor (held up by 2 large steel I-beams) which protects the cows on the ground floor in case of a fire.  Photo taken during the June 2012 Tour.
June 2012 Barn Tour.
Miller Barn.  The barn has a computerized milking system in the parlor which was still used until 2011, but right now no cows use it.
June 2012 Barn Tour.

Photos by Jeff Fitz-Randolph, June 2012
Comments provided by Wilford Yoder, edited by J. Fitz-Randolph.
See Mr. Yoder's photos and more comments at his website, www.wdyphoto.com